Refugee Spent 6 Months Living in Incheon Airport

Article from KBS News:

Why was a young African man living at Incheon Airport?

A 20-something African man spent nearly 6 months living in a waiting area in Incheon Airport. At the end of the legal process, he has become a “free body.”

This is the man who ate a chicken burger and cola for three meals every day.

Why did this young African man live in Incheon airport?

Why did this young African man live in Incheon airport?

The 24-year old young African man spent nearly 6 months living in the departure waiting area at Incheon airport.   Departure waiting area:  On the 3rd floor of the airport, it is a little over 100 pyeong.  This is where those rejected for entry into Korea must wait [for a flight out of Korea or for the legal process to conclude.] There are chairs, TVs, public telephones, and showers available.

The 24-year old young African man spent nearly 6 months living in the departure waiting area at Incheon airport.
Departure waiting area: On the 3rd floor of the airport, it is a little over 100 pyeong [appx. 330 square meteres]. This is where those rejected for entry into Korea must wait [for a flight out of Korea or for the legal process to conclude.] There are chairs, TVs, public telephones, and showers available.

The airline carrier the man used provided him with only a chicken burger for meals.  Since entry was barred, he had to use the public telephones to communicate with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.  He was effectively detained [in the airport.]  This is his story.

The airline carrier the man used provided him with only a chicken burger for meals. Since entry was barred, he had to use the public telephones to communicate with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. He was effectively detained [in the airport.] This is his story.

The man arrived at Incheon international airport in November 2013.  His home country was in the middle of a civil war.  Rejecting a notice to enlist in the military, he escaped to Korea.

The man arrived at Incheon international airport in November 2013. His home country was in the middle of a civil war. Rejecting a notice to enlist in the military, he escaped to Korea.

He had planned originally to enter the country on a temporary visa, but was stopped from doing so at immigration.  He could not give the name of who had invited him to Korea, and his declaration of refugee status was denied.

He had planned originally to enter the country on a temporary visa, but was stopped from doing so at immigration. He could not give the name of who had invited him to Korea, and his declaration of refugee status was denied.

The man was sent back to the departures waiting area.  Fearing for his safety if he were to return to his country, he decided to wait it out here in Korea.

The man was sent back to the departures waiting area. Fearing for his safety if he were to return to his country, he decided to wait it out here in Korea.

He filed 3 lawsuits with the help of a refugee protections group lawyer.  The rulings made in April of last year gave him permission to leave the departures area and meet with a lawyer.

He filed 3 lawsuits with the help of a refugee protections group lawyer. The rulings made in April of last year gave him permission to leave the departures area and meet with a lawyer.

At the end of January this year, a judge ruled that he was not given a hearing about his refugee status, which is a violation of Korean law.

At the end of January this year, a judge ruled that he was not given a hearing about his refugee status, which is a violation of Korean law.

Afterwards, the man was able to apply for a full refugee hearing.  This is 1 year and 3 months after arriving to [Incheon international] airport.

Afterwards, the man was able to apply for a full refugee hearing. This is 1 year and 3 months after arriving to [Incheon international] airport.

The lawsuit focused on the fact that when the rules were followed so strictly, the action violated the part of the [Korean] constitution that protects human rights.

The lawsuit focused on the fact that when the rules were followed so strictly, the action violated the part of the [Korean] constitution that protects human rights. The opinion was also voiced that airport immigration needs changes in order to meet the needs of refugees.

Following a refugee protections law passed in 2013, the number of applications for refugee status rose sharply.

Following a refugee protections law passed in 2013, the number of applications for refugee status rose sharply.

Do you recall the 2004 film,

Do you recall the 2004 film, “Terminal”? This situation is very similar to the events in the movie. It also is about whether or not the leading man will get his happy ending.

Comments from Naver:
dion****

He could be a refugee, or he could be a member of ISIS… If a country takes in every refugee, it will fail.

wann****

I don’t want to know about this kind of news and I don’t feel the need to know it either. Children living in poverty can’t get help from the government, so they are starving. Please care more about the people from this country.

auto****

Trying to make us feel for this guy, but what kind of bullshit is this reporter spewing? He refused to do military service and bounced outta there.

ck2h****

This story is heartbreaking, but what about the many children in our country who are starving? Shouldn’t we feed them before anything else?

syeo****

How is running away from military service a good thing.

miss****

We aren’t a refugee sanctuary. First the government has to protect its own citizens. This country has no responsibility to protect or let in those who came to get away from military service. Reporter, have you lost your mind?

aaaa****

Let’s get rid of this “multiculturalism” stuff. Other countries [that have a lot of diversity] have failed… Why does our country have to be multicultural??

menm****

They wrote this like this man is so pitiful, but he just refused to do military service and came to Korea, then he laid around in the departures waiting area eating chicken burgers and soda for free. He ate well! If war breaks out, can I go to another country and do the same?

is02****

That guy can’t be accepted as a refugee because he was running away from his military service.

sosc****

If we keep taking in refugees, we will be like Europe. [Europe has become] the place for refugees to run to, everyone goes there.

ksyd****

There’s too many of us Koreans crying about how we can’t live. This is just a waste of tax money.

ksyd****

We didn’t pay taxes to help out some douchebag who ran away from his country because he refused to do his military service.

gold****

This is like the time one of ours refused to point a gun at a North Korean, because we are of the same people. If this were a proper country, it would’ve been ruled correct to deny that man entry. It’s never okay for a Korean to avoid military service, so it’s highly contradictory to have a double standard where it’s okay when a foreigner tries to avoid his country’s military service.

rubi****

We’re supposed to feel sympathy for the man who refused to do military service and runs away? While our own country’s youth would be eaten alive and cursed at for doing the same.

kims****

Why did he come to Korea? Go to Japan.

ashd****

The living expenses and a place to stay for refugee applicants is paid for with our taxes. If people keep immigrating here in waves like this, is there nothing else we can do but try to accommodate them? Who is the media rooting for?

mida****

This isn’t the type of thing to draw emotional responses or sympathy. How will this country end up if we let everyone inside under every individual circumstance? Even if he says it’s cruel and curses us after the fact, [the immigration agents] could only judge the situation based on the limited information they had at the time. I think immigration did what they had to do. It might seem strange but I would like to give them credit where credit is due.

qkrd****

Don’t get too friendly with human rights stuff. The countries that take in refugees because they are so pathetic just regret it later as those refugees become tax thieves. If people hear rumors of [Korea letting in refugees,] they will all flock here.

joal****

He’s a military service deserter pretending to be a refugee… It’s not okay to let him in our country.

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  • commander

    I have a great sympathy for his six month ordeal at the airport.

    Unfortunately, multiple international treaties, suggesting criteria for determining refugee status, are unfavorable for the asylum seeker.

    Before stating the standards that are commonly found in the relvant treaties, I’d like emphasize that under international law, whether to permit entry into a country for a foreigner, including a person of other nationality, a stateless person, and a refugee, complete falls within the its sovereign discretion, when he or she has no passport and visa to meet entry requirements.

    Under international treaties, a refugee is defined as a person who refuses protection of their country or refuse to go back to their country when they are ouside of the country on well-grounded reasons that if they return to the contry they will be suject to persecution for their race, religion, political perspectives, or a status as a member of a certain group.

    As important as who is the refugee is who determines the fulfilment of this definition.

    International treaties leave the task to each member country.

    Then we need to take a look at how the S. Korean government has handled the refugee status application cases.

    The answer is that few has been granted refugee status.

    One of the reasons is presumed that many asylum seekers have no sufficent evidence to prove they meet the description of refugee definition. In fact, it’s not easy that they show they are treaty refugees especially when they hurriedly fled horrible things in their home countries without proper documentation.

    It’s all the more so when perceived ethnically honomegenous countries like S. Korea are not institutionally ready enough to provide legal counseling to asylum seekers, who don’t speak a single word in Korean, and whose language makes it hard to find a translator.

    On the other hand, from a government perspective, granting a refugee status readily cound invite a influx of wrong aslyum seekrs, and could infringe on the soverignty of other countries. Well-established international law provides that a state has the right to exercise sovereign jurisdiction over its nationals.

    To sum up, while it’s acknowledged that the Korean government make refugee status review process more accessbile to asylum seekers, asylum seekerks should also be more prepared for their applications for refuee status.

    In my view, chances are not that high hat he is recognized as a refugee because he dodged conscription in his country to flee to S. Korea. Though his country is in civil war, there is no season to see that the military draft for him when he was back in his country is inhumane.

    Even if he doesn’t get recognized as a refugee, that doesn’t mean he needs to be repatriated to his country where he could face a heavy punishment for his violation of conscription law. If sending him back to his country subject him to torture, capital punishment or other forms of severe restriction of his basic human rights, he will and should not be returned to his country.

    He may be allowed to live here without garnering refugee status. His ordeal is an ongoing process.

  • Robz Sarmy

    Always got to mention Japan funny .

  • firebert5

    “We’re supposed to feel sympathy for the man who refused to do military service and runs away? While our own country’s youth would be eaten alive and cursed at for doing the same.”

    While the article does not seem to mention the particular African country he is from (that I can see, if I missed it, let me know), it would not surprise me to find that the government he is fleeing from has changed hands multiple times so that the call to military service may be from a group that he has always opposed and does not see as legitimate (hence the civil war). Not saying either side is right, but I am saying that the above quote displays ignorance of what has fast become typical of many African countries.

    • Chucky3176

      The man is from Sudan which is in the midst of civil war. His claim is that he’ll be forcibly drafted into the military, then he will be located in the front line, where he will be ordered against his will, to slaughter civilians.

      • Boris

        Didn’t Sudan split into two? With the other being called South Sudan? And South Sudan are now having it’s own conflict within it’s boarders?

        I’m asking as I’m out of date on this.

  • Matronomy

    The worst part of this whole story has got to be the response by Korean nations in the comments section. The vile hatred is not from an isolated poster but by the majority of netizens reading the story. Sickening.

    • Sillian

      I sense mostly cynicism rather than ‘vile hatred’. Korean netizens are usually very harsh on Koreans. I wouldn’t expect them to be suddenly all liberal and lovey-dovey just because foreigners are involved. Interestingly, South Korea as a nation is still the most accepting of refugees by far in Asia.

      • Xman2014

        True. He’s now a professor at university of Gwangju, teaching human rights and refugee rights. He played an integral role in changing South Korea’s human rights laws in 2013. He also often gives out lectures on tours, trying to change South Korean’s minds about refugees, and fighting for policy changes at the government level. He feels he will go home to Congo someday, and he always tries to educate his own children who have grown up and adjusted in Korea, not to forget Congo. He wants them to go back to Congo and rebuild their country someday. He’s quite a chap.

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Ol5W8XwLjs

      • FootysDick Vermeil

        KOREAN MONKEYS!!!! :-P

        • 나디아 재화

          Do everyone here a favor and just drink a whole bottle of bleach…

      • cantonizi

        Keep them there and don’t send them to China.
        China has too many already, like close to a million too many.

    • angy

      how dare you?
      it’s natural as it gets
      If you are like a foreign jerk, you can go back to your country. They feel right as they ought to be.

  • Xman2014

    South Korea has never traditionally been a popular refugee destination, so fewer applicants are going to apply. Nor is the country traditionally accepting of refugees when it was a developing country unable to provide for its own people, as well as from those who applied from outside. Then there are the North Korean question once the North Korea collapses, and the North Korean refugees expected to flood into South Korea. Even now, there are almost 29,000 North Korean refugees getting state aid, while the budget will have to continue to increase as more and more North Korean refugees arrive. Can South Korea really afford to take care of everyone from outside? That’s a lingering question that everyone is asking and doubting. Yet in 2013, there were sweeping refugee laws that went into effect, which made the number of applicants to soar from 1100 in 2013, to over 2800 in 2014. Out of that South Korea still took in a record 633 people in 2014, according to Korea Herald in an article on Jan 29, 2015.

    This number is the highest and the most generous in Asia, a continent which as a whole, is pretty much stingy when it comes to generosity towards refugees. Just look at how China/Vietnam/Laos/Cambodia treats North Korean refugees fleeing North Korea, and the fact that one of the richest country in Asia, Japan took in only 11 people out of over 4000 applicants last year. Compared to the abysmal refugee asylum record of most Asian countries, South Korea is the only country that’s starting to open up further, while other countries in Asia have always had a closed door policy.

    • redwhitedude

      Eventually the welcome will wear out if it is perceived that Korea is taking too many refugees like any other country. However this could generate a little bit more good will towards Korea.

  • Small twon

    No matter what cause(I am completely with that African guy though) person who is running from military service can’t find much sympathy among Korean man.

    Even among rich and powerful Koreans, not doing(or can’t) military service is huge social stigma.

    • Xman2014

      The news article doesn’t even explain why the African wanted to flee the military conscription, and which country he is from. It’s no wonder really, why those Korean netizens won’t be too sympathetic towards draft dodgers. Without the article explaining the background and circumstances of this man to an audience who generally don’t have a clue about Africa, I’m not surprised by the lack of sympathy for the African.

  • military service for this man won’t be just a 2-year camping trip…
    anyways im looking forward to his mixtape

  • FootysDick Vermeil

    LET THE NEGROS GO EXTINCT!!!!!

    those beasts have been around the longest, and have delicious natural resources under their feet, but continue fighting wars dating back to the homo erectus days…..

    NEGROIDS DO NOT NEED TO POLLUTE OTHER CONTINENTS!!!! LET THESE HOMINIDS DIE OUT!!!!

    think about all those delicious natural resources under their feet! :D

    • Chucky3176

      Interesting rant, for a Canadian ESL teacher.

      Here’s my take on all this. Let them come. That is, if they want to come, stay, and they want to contribute to this society by working to make the society better for all. African refugees who do this are welcome.

      The people who are not welcome are those people who are temporary floaters, who just want to make a fast buck, who then constantly complains and whines that the culture is not the same as the one back home, and finally moving on to another country, to repeat and rinse. Those blood suckers should just stay out.

  • takasar1

    “Let’s get rid of this “multiculturalism” stuff.
    Other countries [that have a lot of diversity] have failed… Why does our
    country have to be multicultural??”

    give me a list.
    and i wouldn’t bring up the usual scandinavians and western/central europeans, because their countries are better than yours….

    • prin12

      Its true, multiculturalism has failed in many countries. Even angela merkel of germany has said it herself “multiculturalism in germany has completely failed”. So tell me which of those countries are better than south korea in what exactly?

      • takasar1

        has it now??? well david cameron said it hasn’t failed. who’s telling the truth?

        well, let’s start with wealth, income and social security.

        • prin12

          Oh really? when did he say that? that multiculturalism has not failed? You don’t know the political climate around the multiculturalism issue in the UK do you? as for South Korea, it ranks higher than the majority of those “better countries” you mentioned. Take a look at the human development index as an example which is based on wealth, income, social security, education, health etc. Not to mention despite the fact that south korea’s annual economic growth rate is still faster than most other advanced economies. The west is lagging behind and is not longer the most developed anymore. Maybe the koreans are doing something right.

          • takasar1

            that’s the point genius. just because somebody says ‘multiculturalism has failed’, it doesn’t mean too much, seeing as i can easily find those who think it succeeded.
            yes, as a matter of fact i do. the right hate it and the left love it, same as always. tell me, what has that got to do with anything? has it ‘failed’ just because the lower and middle classes in those countries suffering the effects of economic crisis, are getting a bit vocal all of a sudden? perspective my friend. note that they weren’t really going on about it a decade ago.

            well, *chortle*, i kind of did. and according to the inequality adjusted hdi report, korea ranks below ‘those’ countries. below portugal, greece, spain, france, germany, switzerland, norway, holland, etc. so you can’t exactly argue that immigration brings countries down, seeing as these states seem to be doing better than korea. as for the west ‘lagging behind’. yes, it kind of is, but not because of korea, singapore, taiwan, etc but because of the rebirth of china and india, the emergence of indonesia and the potential of thailand, philippines and vietnam. besides, judging from recent reports, korea is heading for japan-style stagnation very soon unless it does something, it may not be ‘growing faster’ for long.

          • guest

            “judging from recent reports, korea is heading for japan-style stagnation
            very soon unless it does something, it may not be ‘growing faster’ for
            long.”

            No it won’t. Unlike Japan, South Korea doesn’t have a debt that’s more than 200% of its GDP. South Korea has low debt and high fiscal reserves which would enable it to survive through any crisis.

            South Korea was one of the few developed countries that didn’t suffer from the 2008-09 financial crisis.

            Also, the division of Korea is a mixed blessing. It’s bad that families are divided but there’s a benefit. South Korea’s population will have more young people, which would add to the labor force, and it can boost the economy if re-unification were to happen. North Korea’s birth rate is high. Korea is not like Japan where the birth rate is low so that its population is shrinking and the number of seniors is growing thus adding more burden to the economy. Korea’s future is bright.

            Also, Korea has a high diaspora population. South Korea’s population was 48 million in 2008 and in 2014, it’s estimated to be at 51 million. How did the population grow? Because of immigrants, mostly from Koreans living in China. China has the largest number of Koreans, outside of the Korean peninsula, in the world

          • takasar1

            you don’t seem to understand…

            “Unlike Japan, South Korea doesn’t have a debt that’s more than 200% of its GDP”. null point. japan didn’t have a debt-gdp ratio of over 200% before its lost decades, in fact it’s ratio was a tame 65% back in 1989. ballooning public debt was an effect, not a cause.

            “South Korea has low debt and high fiscal reserves which would enable it to survive through any crisis”. no, no it doesn’t. well, it does have healthy forex reserves to help with any potential capital flight but that’s not really an issue. as for debt: it has loads. gross debt is 286% of gdp. with corporate debt clocking in at 160% and household debt is booming, at over 80%. that’s not healthy. loose credit, low rates and funneling of debt into the household sector, contributes to the waste of money on fried chicken stores or some other crap.

            “South Korea was one of the few developed countries that didn’t suffer from the 2008-09 financial crisis”. quantitative easing-bond yields-investment opportunities east-capital flight. its also why singapore, taiwan, malaysia and hong kong rebounded strongly too. all these nations seem to share a certain geographical trait…..

            as for the ‘north-korea-will-fuse-with-south-korea-thereby-creating-a-demographic-boom’ theory, its a decade too late. firstly, no economic/financial planner/minister can ever make concrete plans pertaining to potential re-unification. rumours regarding the north’s collapse have been around for ages. haven’t come true yet. besides, the north’s fertility rate was projected to be 2.05 on average since the start of this millenium. combine that with a predicted birth rate of 14.6 (in 2010) and any demographer would tell you that unless korea re-unifies within a decade, this ‘boom’ ain’t happening.

            “was 48 million in 2008 and in 2014, it’s estimated to be at 51 million”. well, china’s population was 1’324m in 2008 and is now 1’367m. what’s your point? you’re going to attribute that incremental increase purely to the return of migrants?!?!? sorry, did korea send out tens of millions of migrants in the past 100 years or something? can we expect all of these imaginary expats to return constantly for the next 50 years? your argument doesn’t make any sense, especially considering that only 2-3 million koreans live in china at most. japan’s fertility rate dipped below the replacement rate first in 1973, yet the population only began falling 35 years later. korea will grow for a while, but stop presumably within a decade. immigration is the only possible stop-block. korea should take advantage of its relatively youthful working age population and increase its fertility rate.

            japan’s economy stagnated due to the bursting of an asset/debt bubble, horrendous policies, a relatively ‘closed-off’ economy and most importantly of all, demographics. for all that crap about the US being a ‘boom-bust’ economy, a completely liberal market economy and capitalist benchmark, their economy grew relatively quickly in the last half century due to a corresponding demographic boom (and the entry of women into the work force), bought upon by immigration and a high birth rate. gdp, the most widely used measure, is nothing but a masturbation tool for accountants, the more inputs and the more the labour to shove in said inputs, the larger the ‘growth’. i don’t really believe in deflation so we’ll discount that, but korea needs to work quickly and hard to ensure it doesn’t end up like japan. it should start by improving service-sector productivity and actively trying to increase the birth rate, all the whilst slowly opening the immigration tap.

          • guest

            The South Korean government made sure that it won’t suffer another 1997 style economic meltdown. The 2008-09 crisis happened. It was a test to see if the government’s policy worked. Guess what? It did work. Remember, Koreans are a very nationalistic bunch, they did whatever it took to get through the 1997 Asian financial crisis such as, most famous of all, selling or donating their jewelry to help pay off their country’s debt. After the 1997 Asian financial crisis, South Korea’s economy skyrocketed.

            Also, it’s not me who says that “South Korea has low debt and high fiscal reserves which would enable it to survive through any crisis.” I was quoting the IMF. You trying to disprove that just made me laugh and not take your comment seriously

          • Traveller

            I’ve been to southern Europe, Portugal, Spain, Greece, Italy, and South Korea. There ain’t no way in hell Portugal, Spain, Italy, and Greece are doing economically better than S.Korea. I don’t know what this inequality indicator thing is, but it sounds like BS to me, unless they’re talking about S.Korea’s old people living in poverty.

          • takasar1

            take up your problems with the international body that conducts such research.

            as for the poverty angle, yes. i assume it is related to that

          • Traveller

            Considering that those old people will be lacking education (many were illeterates and lacked university degrees, compared to their grand children), and lack income, I can see how that would effect S.Korea’s overall scoring. S.Korea was a third world country and far below Southern Europe, when the old Koreans today were young.

          • takasar1

            let’s not try and hype up southern europe. they’re commonly seen as the basket cases of the western economic world. and this isnt only a post-2011 phenomenon. especially in the case of greece, they were seen as the ‘olive oil’ economies who benefitted greatly from EU freebies and based their economies not in buying/selling/making/consuming but in tourism and other tertiary sector useless services. spain, italy and portugal are only a decade ahead of south korea at most. by 2005, south korea was already at the level where italy (the richest of the three) was at in 1995 (income and gdp per capita basis). greece is actually below korea to this day.

          • Korean

            ” spain, italy and portugal are only a decade ahead of south korea at most”

            What? Per capita wise, S.Korea surpassed Portugal and Greece a while back, and there’s not much different gap left with Spain and Italy, both economies that hide behind EU’s Euro, and depend too much on tourism. Now that value of Euro has been going down for the last couple of years, while S.Korea is approaching 30K this year, how do you even come up with the theory that Spain, Italy, and Portugal are “decades ahead of South Korea”? Not that South Korea is that great either, but Europe is doing even far worse.

          • Traveller

            United States at number 28, has worse living condition than Greece and Hungary? I’m sorry, but that’s hard to accept and believe that this indicator can be considered the only final indicator that measures development. If what you’re saying is valid, then how do you explain United States, the most multicultural country in the planet, doing so badly in this ranking? Some things don’t seem to add up here.

          • cantonizi

            Blacks from Afrika don’t go to the US any more, they don’t like to being in another army that goes after muslim terrorists.

          • Traveller
          • K

            Looking at inequality adjusted human development index, South Korea comes in at 33rd. Hardly an enviable position by OECD standards. In fact, out of OECD nations, only Turkey, Chile and Mexico rank below South Korea.

        • Sillian

          It seems prin12 is referring to this remark. It really depends on the context after all.

          http://www.theguardian.com/world/2010/oct/17/angela-merkel-german-multiculturalism-failed

          I don’t think comparing between different countries in absolute economic terms in this debate is very insightful. The comparison should be made between each developed European country’s hypothetical situation where there was no mass immigration or a lot more selective and controlled immigration and their current state. Whether they could’ve been better in various terms without mass immigration, compared to their own current state. Also, it seems different ethnic enclaves can create very different types or degrees of social discord. When people say they oppose multiculturalism, I figure they usually mean they oppose large scale immigration of specific ethnic or cultural groups instead of opposing everyone foreign coming to their country.

          • takasar1

            read my post below. as for my original post, i simply argued against the notion that multi-culturalism failed. people have short memories of europe and the west before 2008. the poster seemed to think it has failed elsewhere simply due to recent events. to imply that immigration and ‘multiculturalism’ has failed in europe is to openly and loudly state out to the world

            “i have data regarding the five major european economies post 1980, when immigration began to kick off. i have income and gross gdp stats, in addition to living condition reports. all my data tells me that the economy and civil society in said european countries has regressed markedly post-1990 and that living conditions have deteriorated. berlin, london, paris, madrid and rome are now slums and corruption-riddled hell-holes where natives cower in fear and black/muslim gangs run riot, where anarchy is rampant.”

      • Amelia Darte

        not in football as i see ,jerk ass ,if you look at germany team half of them not even blond and they win worldcup ,so fuck up and drink soju and go to hell

    • johnny

      are you joking, just look at the US, all the disgusting fucking niggers shooting each other and whites

  • Guy Forget

    This is just more propaganda to warm the korean people’s hearts towards refugees and try to prepare them for the entrance of millions of refugees and poor migrants in the coming years. They did this in UK, France, and dozens of other first world nations and now look at them today….they are riddled with refugees, poor immigrants living off welfare, sucking the system, and then creating ethnic ghettos, racial violence and crimes, terrorism….. we are supposed to feel sorry for this guy? Screw that. There’s 1 billion more like him who want to do the same thing. It’s time to stop feeling sorry for 80% of the world’s population who live in 2nd or 3rd world countries and start feeling sorry for the 1st world peoples who are losing everything due to the influx of the billions of overpopulated refugee/poor migrant countries.

  • angrylad

    All I can say is shame on everybody who says multi-culture is a bad thing, you are all hypocrites. A lot of Koreans don’t want people to come to their country but they like to go to others’. I am in London and since 2010 the number of Korean immigrants has more that quadrupled and someone can turn around and say let us not let refugees into our country. If other countries were to say that about Koreans there would be an outcry about how bad foreign countries are to Asian people. People should really think before they speak. If you don’t want a multi-cultural society then tell all your people to stay in Korea, don’t invite teachers from foreign countries. Be like North Korea and shut yourselves out from the rest of the world!

    • Sillian

      I am in London and since 2010 the number of Korean immigrants has more that quadrupled and someone can turn around and say let us not let refugees into our country.

      Koreans virtually do not immigrate to the UK for permanent residency. Most Koreans in the UK are international students who spend money in the UK. Are you comparing them to refugees? I can’t decode your comment.

      If other countries were to say that about Koreans there would be an outcry about how bad foreign countries are to Asian people.

      Are you assuming a hypothetical situation where there are Korean refugees? Is there an obligation for any country to have an open door immigration policy? Many Korean netizens seem sympathetic towards Europe’s recent anti mass immigration climate.

      If you don’t want a multi-cultural society then tell all your people to stay in Korea, don’t invite teachers from foreign countries.

      Anybody can move to wherever they meet the requirements from the host nations. That has nothing to do with what immigration policies some of their countrymen want in their own country. When Korean netizens say they oppose multiculturalism, they usually mean they oppose promoting immigration of socioeconomically underprivileged laborers. I never see them talk about all foreigners in the same brush when it comes to immigration.

  • What?!!!

    I wonder what he’s running away from.

  • Guest

    except that im pretty sure military service in korea and africa are probably two very different things. he isnt going to sit and train in a camp for 2 years and go back home.

  • Xio Gen

    Why do so many Koreans seem to think multiculturalism has caused societies to “fail”? Have they been reading Stormfront or something? Last I checked, America is still the most powerful country in the world and was built on immigration. Then there’s Singapore, which is so diverse there isn’t a true Singaporean ethnicity. There’s also Macau and Hong Kong. Taiwan also has lots of Asian ethnicities including the indigenous Formosans. China has dozens of ethnic groups and ethnolinguistic groups and they’re extremely successful.

    That being said, why would an African refugee want to go to Korea? I can understand southeast Asians, but Africans? Do they not know how racist East Asians are? Europe and North America are much more attainable and aren’t as racist towards refugees.

    • Korean

      You mention Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan, China, and South East Asia, but all of them were multi-ethnics since their inceptions. None of them are where refugees are flooding in, nor accepted into. If you really look at all the East Asian countries in terms of openness to refugees in Asia, South Korea has the best and most open program for refugees, than any other Asian country. China doesn’t even accept refugees (look how they treat the North Korean refugees), and Japan’s immigration is far more stricter than Korea’s.

  • sara

    they are so stupid this is not “military service” this is about going to war, stupid korean comments

    • Sillian

      Doing military service means you are going to war if war breaks out. I mean, that’s the point of military service, isn’t it? Or is it just for fitness? Obviously those are not separate concepts. What are you trying to say?

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