Japanese Government Launches ‘Dokdo is Japanese’ Ad Campaign

japanese-government-places-ads-regarding-dokdo-in-japanese-newspapers

From Naver :

Japanese Government Publishes First Advertisements Claiming “Dokdo is Japanese Territory” in Newspapers.

The Japanese Government has begun to assert its claims that Dokdo is Japanese territory through the placement of advertisements in newspapers.

According to the Japanese media, on the 11th of this month roughly 70 newspapers, both local and national, printed these adverts arguing that the islets are Japanese territory.

These newspaper advertisements are scheduled to run for a week and are the first comments released by the Japanese government to address the sovereignty of Dokdo.

The Japanese Foreign Ministry advert entitled ‘Now we need to know. The basic knowledge on the Takeshima question,’ argues that historically, and according to international law, the territory is inherently Japanese.

A one-sided version of history is also laid out stating ‘Korean sovereignty was established no later than the mid-17th century and in 1905 the possession of the islands was confirmed.’

The advertisement further argues: ‘Korea has recently been arguing it gets more valid sympathy than Japan, but the literature has been vague, and there has been no verifiable or clear increase of the amount they receive.’

The announcement was conveyed through the Prime Minister’s office. In various press conferences and in the National Assembly, Prime Minister Noda has revealed that he will attempt to strengthen Japan’s public relations campaign in the face of Korea’s sovereign claims over of Dokdo.

Comments from Naver:

sakk****:

I find it ridiculous that they had to go as far as to make a special broadcast to raise money.

hsys****:

This will soon be like a legend the next generation hears about their greedy ancestors who meet a nasty end and the Japanese Islands will probably have disappeared from the map.

psil****:

I think our government is being pretty tough as well.

sakk****:

Newspapers have also confidently announced non-factual reports about the recruitment of comfort women.

dong****:

They’re bullshitting and flinging this crap around.

stee****:

In yesterday’s news they shook hands and then immediately struck the back of one another’s heads… typical Japan …. laughing whilst catching people off guard.

kimh****:

There are plenty of Japanese people who know that Dokdo is Korean land, and don’t eat the Rightists’ sweets.

cjyt****:

Japan themselves are so dishonorable.

cjyt****:

This time, Dokdo was the bastard whose finger they sucked on.

The contested islands lie in the East Sea, and are named Dokdo by Koreans, and Takeshima by Japan.

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  • Matt

    Well, at least Japan is now fighting back. I was getting rather tired of the one-sided nature of this issue. Maybe if this keeps up, I’ll no longer have to sympathize for Japan as the quiet, timid underdog. It would be nice to be annoyed with both sides equally.

    • TheOther

      “Japan as the quiet, timid underdog”

      What?

      http://www.koreabang.com/2012/stories/japanese-anti-korea-demonstration-korean-netizen-reactions.html

      This is literally on the same website as this. Not to mention a couple of governors and various other government elected officials (some mentioned in that link, others can be linked to in the comments section I’m sure).

    • Pat

      lol @ you thinking the japanese are always so sweet innocent, incapable of bigotry

      • Matt

        @ TheOther & Pat:

        I’m talking about the general populace—not a couple of government officials or a couple hundred ultra-nationalists out of a country of 127 million. Nothing I’ve seen so far has led me to believe that the average Japanese person is as impassioned and inflamed about this issue as the average Korean.

        Perhaps the notion of different people having different beliefs is an alien concept to you. Is Paul Ryan “proof” that all Americans are fiscal conservatives? Is Obama “proof” that all Americans support deficit spending? Surely these two can’t simultaneously be true. And I suppose furthermore that the Westboro Baptist Church is “proof” that all Americans hate gays, while Lady Gaga is “proof” that all Americans support homosexuality. These must all be true, right? After all, we all know there’s no such thing as a fringe group! What a silly idea to even suggest!

        • Patrick

          Very true Matt. Agree with you.

        • TheOther

          “Perhaps the notion of different people having different beliefs is an alien concept to you.”

          I think this concept is going to be more alien to you since you’re the one that said “Nothing I’ve seen so far has led me to believe that the average Japanese person is as impassioned and inflamed about this issue as the average Korean.” Since you don’t know what the average Korean person is, and I doubt you know what the average Japanese person is truly like either. Do you know how popular Japanese people/products are in Korea? (http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/dy/world/T100830003029.htm). And it’s not like the manga “Hating; the korean wave” wasn’t a commercial success leading the author to create a sequel with a combined sale of more that 650,000 copies. (cite: http://www.japanfocus.org/-Mathew-Allen/2535), and was just bought by a “couple *hundred* ultra-nationalists out of a country of 127 million”. I’m not saying nor have I ever said all Japanese people hate Koreans or even “the Average Japanese person”, all I’m saying is that you have a very skewed way of looking at these two countries, which is in direct contradiction with these numbers, (which I went through the trouble of citing for you from websites that cater specifically to Japanese interests). Which leads me to think would you view China like this as well? A country of over a billion people.

          I could also say the same thing as well; “that from what I have seen the average Korean person isn’t as inflamed as the average Japanese person about this issue. And that the people in those protest in Korea are from a couple hundred fringe protestors.” Your anecdotal evidence isn’t better than mine is all I am saying. (But for a little anecdotal evidence of my own, which I fully recognize and should not in anyway be construed as a fact or a blanket generalization; it seems that it’s the elderly of both parties that are the most impassioned, and hopefully most of this will blow away with time)

          As a general rule I would advice you against making generalizing statements about entire countries as diverse as these two, and to not personify nations like they’re people. That doesn’t do anybody any good, and produces ignorant statements, and burns bridges between these two countries that really should get along. (Of course you would say that the “average japanese” wants to get along but it’s those DAMN DIRTY UNCIVILIZED KOREANS are the ones stopping it, and the internet equilibrium stays in balence right?)

          • Matt

            Did you even read the second article you linked to? I did—in its entirety—and the last third of that article is essentially a refutation of the simplistic interpretation that the manga’s success is evidence of the prominence of Japanese ultra-nationalism. As it points out, that manga was a reactionary work spawned as an antithesis to mainstream beliefs in Japanese society (postwar guilt, embracing Hanryu, apoliticism, etc.), and furthermore, was as much a media story about it being a media story (i.e., famous for being famous) as it was a genuine manifestation of genuine ultra-nationalism:

            “In the sense that these elements stimulated the consumption of discourses and images of Korea as a problem country for Japan, we may conclude that the phenomenon of the Kenkanryu boom was as much about the internet, and commercialized and media nationalism in Japan, as it was about the ethnocentric content of the product. ”

            Additionally, it points out that a significant proportion of the support for the manga was merely apolitical reaction against the k-pop culture wave itself:

            “Even those who are sympathetic to the views expressed within these publications may be reacting to the phenomenon of the ‘Korean Wave’ itself rather than forming anything intrinsically neo-nationalist: a reaction to the pop cultural ‘invasion’ by their neighbors. And while it is tempting to cite this example as another instance of increasing nationalism among Japanese youth, such a statement has little or no empirical foundation.”

            Lastly, in retrospect of all I’ve seen here on koreaBang and elsewhere, I can’t help but sympathize with this sentiment:

            “Yamano’s position seems to be that those who find Korean popular culture attractive, fashionable, cool and hip, do not know the ‘true’ Korea, and his comics shows the ‘other side’ of Korea.”

            So, so much for that “citation”. And as for your first one, all it says is that Japanese food is popular in South Korea. Wow! Big whoop-dee-doo. Who would have thought that a cuisine that’s delicious, nutritious, aesthetically appealing, and fashionable and trendy elsewhere in the world would be similarly received in South Korea. Maybe that article would be somewhat relevant to your “refutation” if it didn’t also mention the immense popularity of Korean food in Japan.

            With respect to your denunciation of my “anecdotal evidence”, perhaps you missed it, but all my original comment was was a mere admission that my own personal anecdotal evidence has been responsible for my own impermanent and liable-to-change view of this issue. Apparently the tongue-in-cheek last sentence of my original comment was too subtle for you (and C84 and Pat).

          • chucky3176

            All this tells me is people just see what they want to see.

          • TheOther

            “the last third of that article is essentially a refutation of the simplistic interpretation that the manga’s success is evidence of the prominence of Japanese ultra-nationalism.”

            I only used that article to point out that the fringe group is larger than “a couple hundred ultra-nationalists out of a country of 127 million.” I never said that it was rising, or any change in that matter. However the article was more nuanced than what you seemed to have gathered as evidenced by your ability to pick and choose parts of that article while ignoring others, specifically this line:

            “Does the existence of this comic mean that Japanese youth are becoming more ‘nationalistic’? More extreme? Our discussion above has cast doubt on this.[15] But there are disturbing new statistics about the increasing political conservatism of Japanese youth, described by Sasada[16] (2006:119), who points to the commecial success of manga on such topics as Kenkanryu, suggesting that audiences who read them are in fact digesting and accommodating narrow and sometimes bigoted views on nationalism in a format they can comprehend and relate to, and that they provide ‘a bridge between young readers and conservative scholars’.”

            The author seems to do a good job in discerning that human motivation is complex, providing many reason why this comic became popular, and all I can say is this isn’t just particular to Japanese people, and that there are many reasons, and motivations various fringe Koreans may want to go to protests that isn’t necessarily locked to nationalism, but is a convenient tool, like these people on 2-channeru found out. Perhaps you can also look through your own biases and come to the same realization that everyone is complex. But that would require introspection and when you write things like this:

            “Lastly, in retrospect of all I’ve seen here on koreaBang and elsewhere, I can’t help but sympathize with this sentiment:
            ‘Yamano’s position seems to be that those who find Korean popular culture attractive, fashionable, cool and hip, do not know the ‘true’ Korea, and his comics shows the ‘other side’ of Korea.’ ”

            Where you try to make good and bad, right and wrong distinctions, where the ‘true’ side of Korea is something undesirable, you aren’t making yourself out to be a reasonable person based on logic, rather you are relying on emotional rants that you accuse the Koreans of doing. Have you wondered exactly why you feel this way? What events brought about this to make you feel this way? And was the the next logical step really Koreans are inconsolable, emotional and illogical?

            “And as for your first one, all it says is that Japanese food is popular in South Korea. Wow! Big whoop-dee-doo.”

            And what would evidence would you need exactly to show that Koreans, and Japanese share a common interest in peace, and that a large enough group of Koreans actually do love Japanese people/culture. And why isn’t this a good enough article? (From anecdotal evidence, since it seems it’s good enough for you, Seoul is probably the only place in the world that has enough Japanese restaurants to eat at a different restaurant for each meal for a year, and some even only have a Japanese menu to be more authentic, where else in the world do people love Japanese culture/cuisine like this?)

            “Maybe that article would be somewhat relevant to your “refutation” if it didn’t also mention the immense popularity of Korean food in Japan.”

            How does that refute what I said about how a lot of Koreans love Japanse people/culture? Doesn’t wanting authentic Japanese food mean that there is an interest in learning about that culture? Are you saying that is a bad thing that the article is showing that there is a lot of cultural sharing happening between the two nations. Isn’t this something that you would want? Or does it not fit into your narrative that everything Korean is inherently bad/evil/wrong and thus shouldn’t infect Japan?

          • Matt

            “Have you wondered exactly why you feel this way? What events brought about this to make you feel this way?”

            I don’t need to “wonder” about what led me to believe what I believe. I deeply despise nationalism, and in retrospect of many, many life experiences accumulated over an extended period of time in many different settings and contexts, I have simply accrued more experiences dealing with Korean nationalism than Japanese nationalism. Sorry, but you can’t convince me of the nonexistence of things I’ve already personally experienced.

            As I already said in my original comment, I would be more than happy to be annoyed with both sides equally, and I am in fact grateful for anything that makes me dislike the Japanese. As someone of mixed Chinese heritage, I have far more to gain—personally—from hating the Japanese than sympathizing with or feeling sorry for them. I would love to be as gung-ho ethnocentric and nationalistic as my peers, but curse my inconvenient Western liberal proclivity for impartial justice and universal righteousness that impedes such a primal and sensible natural instinct.

          • TheOther

            “I deeply despise nationalism”

            Ok I feel like I understand where you are coming from more with this, and we definitely agree on this topic.

            “Sorry, but you can’t convince me of the nonexistence of things I’ve already personally experienced.”

            And I’m not saying that your experience didn’t happen, or that it isn’t important that it happened to you, and that it’s important for anybody to learn from their experiences. But learn your lessons with reason, since it could have been any group of people what were nationalistic around/towards you, and the chance of this changes with where you live, and other social factors. The fact that you noticed this pattern above the other patterns of nationalistic people and felt strongly enough to comment, I feel, says more about you rather than those people.

            “As I already said in my original comment, I would be more than happy to be annoyed with both sides equally, and I am in fact grateful for anything that makes me dislike the Japanese.”

            (So hopefully you were joking when you wrote that, as sarcasm doesn’t translate to text well, I think we all know that getting happiness out of hating something rarely leads to lasting happiness that you can look back on with fondness) However it seems that when you do see other acts of Japanese nationalism, you seem to automatically say that those acts were from just a fringe group. I’m not saying hate Japan as equally mind you; I’m just saying that your ability to see a multifaceted Japan could extend to other countries, and making generalizations about a country isn’t exactly something I would call a “liberal proclivity for impartial justice and universal righteousness”.

            I mean I don’t know if I’m being overly critical as I do think I understand where you are coming from in general, but there are a couple of inconsistencies that my ability for cognitive dissonance can’t over come. It’s like if someone were to say that all black people are lazy just because all the ones that he/she met have been lazy, but they told you that they believe in “impartial justice and universal righteousness”. I mean I don’t know what your view on this kind of racism is, but if you really do consider yourself just, and righteous, I would definitely reconsider your own self image.

        • C84

          Matt’s comment is a laughable, self-contradictory hot mess. You make a generalization about Koreans (the “average” Korean person is impassioned and inflamed about the territorial issue as opposed to the “average” Japanese person). You say “Perhaps the notion of different people having different beliefs is an alien concept to you.” You’re going against your own statement – because to you, different Korean people cannot have different beliefs about this territorial issue, since you made a generalization. Then you bring in American examples like Paul Ryan, Obama, Lady Gaga, and Westboro – I’m not sure why. You imply that it’s not acceptable to make generalizations about Americans (no one made a generalization about Americans). By the way, you made a generalization about Japanese people too (albeit a positive one), saying they’re not as “inflamed or impassioned” about this issue as Korean people are. So it’s okay to make a negative generalization about Koreans, a positive generalization about Japanese, and no generalizations at all about Americans (because there are fringe groups with extreme ideas in America, but not in SK, right)? Do I have this correct? I totally agree with TheOther and Pat, btw. Thanks for your comments.

          • Matt

            “You’re going against your own statement – because to you, different Korean people cannot have different beliefs about this territorial issue, since you made a generalization.”

            A generalization does not exclude the possibility of variance. Even the most varied numerical data set still has a mathematical mean.

            “By the way, you made a generalization about Japanese people too (albeit a positive one), saying they’re not as “inflamed or impassioned” about this issue as Korean people are.”

            No, I said that “nothing I’ve seen so far has led me to believe that the average Japanese person is as impassioned and inflamed about this issue as the average Korean.” The subject of that sentence is “nothing I’ve seen so far”, and the predicate is “has led me to believe”. To confuse that as something analogous to, “It is a fact that the average Japanese person is not as impassioned and inflamed about this issue as the average Korean”, would necessitate a profound lack of English reading comprehension. Then again, so would your failure to understand why I mentioned those analogous American examples (hint: it had nothing to do with Americans).

          • C84

            Wow, turning to personal insults, how classy of you. Are we still in elementary school? I have a “profound lack of English reading comprehension?” You can throw your linguistic analysis at me all day long, but it still does not change the fact that you contradicted yourself. How utterly convenient that you choose to ignore my comment about the fact you made a generalization, and at the same time, say to someone that “Perhaps the notion of different people having different beliefs is an alien concept to you?” You use the phrase “the average person” as a way to worm out of what is essentially a generalization, like it or not.

            Interesting how your reply focused almost entirely on the linguistic analysis of a sentence which I admit wasn’t well written on my part. I should have quoted in entirety, and yet I chose to summarize, which allowed you to get ammunition to throw insults my way (“profound lack of English reading comprehension”). Is that because you have nothing to say about my comment regarding your contradiction other than this laughable excuse “Even the most varied numerical data set still has a mathematical mean.”

          • Matt

            This isn’t a matter of “linguistics”—it’s a matter of what I said, and what I didn’t say. I simply did not say what you think I said. I tried to clarify that to you by grammatically breaking down what I said in my original comment, but apparently you found that insulting. I don’t know how I could possibly make this any simpler; you’re going to have to accept the fact that there’s a disconnect between what I said and what you think I said.

            This discussion can’t progress any further until you understand what I wrote in my last two posts, so please don’t try to stretch this any further without first taking a minute or two to re-read and finally understand my prior three comments (which honestly aren’t all that complicated). If that’s not to be so, then so be it and have a good day.

  • lonetrey

    Oh my gslgkjsdfglkdjs. This is stupid. Just send a demolition crew there already, and this situation will be defused by a simple fuse!

    I apologize in advance for making that pun. :P

  • Cleo

    In real news, Mulan is played by Korean American Jamie Chung on tonight’s season premiere of “Once Upon a Time” – get it? Because she’s brave.

    Japan’s not going to get away with anything it wants to accomplish.

    • k

      I watched Once Upon a Time last night too and was verrrrrrrrry disappointed in their choice of Jamie Chung to play Mulan…..they chose a korean woman to play a legendary chinese character, they should of picked one of the many beautiful chinese actresses tobmake the role more authentic….Jamie Chung is a reality tv star on Mtv who has had multiple plastic surgery done to her face…..why not pick a beautiful, legit.chinese actress to give authenticity and class to.such a great character?

      • Shawna

        In that vein, I guess I’ll add that they used a Chinese actress to play in the movie version of Memoirs of a Geisha, which is a famously Japanese profession.

        • k

          Hollywood believes in “as long as they look asian, its good enough, Americans cant tell the difference anyway”…..I dunno, I know Im ranting to the wind and probably most people dot care, but I like to see authenticity in some historical roles…and Jamie Chung just annoys me….she was a GORGEOUS natural korean woman and then had to go mess her naturally beautiful looks up with nose and eye surgeries and while she still looks asian, she looks less korean and there was nothing wrong with her natural korean looks to begin with…

          • Matt

            Agreed. Historical authenticity plays an obviously important role in historical period films, yet Hollywood consistently disregards it as irrelevant. This is why I believe that the role of Hua Mulan should have been played by a genuine Chinese corpse excavated from the Northern Wei dynasty. To feature an actress from 2012 is a blatant disregard for the historical heritage of the legendary Chinese heroine.

    • Chris

      Why was Russell Crowe allowed to play the main role in Gladiator?
      Why was Gerard Butler allowed to play Leonidas?
      Why was Johnny Depp allowed to play Jack Sparrow?

      Don’t see anyone asking these questions… if the actor can fit the role, don’t see why it matters. No need to typecast Asians. Yes, it is Jamie Chung, but the focus should be on her personally, not the fact that she’s Korean.

      • k

        This is the last statement I will ever respond to you with. If there were a block button you would be the first one Id block.

        • Chris

          What the fuck? I’m just making a generalized statement about racial typecasting. Please tell me what’s wrong with any part of my comment. I apologize if I offended you before.

          I mean, is Jamie Chung a shitty peson? Maybe. But if you want me to address you directly, I would say that your statement that Mulan should’ve been played by a “beautiful Chinese actress to make it more authentic” is potentially degrading in both degrading in terms of gender and race.

          Who said Mulan was ‘beautiful’? Saying that a heroine must be ‘beautiful’ is implying that physical beauty is a key characteristic of good female character, which is obviously flawed (and some feminists would probably say backwards) logic.

          Second, if someone can match the general look of a character and play the character well, why should ethnicity matter as much? Like I pointed out, people tend to have a double standard, where they don’t mind when one white man completely apes another white man’s culture (see: Russel Crowe playing a Roman general/gladiator, of Spanish origin if I’m not mistaken, Gerard Butler playing a Greek king, etc.) but suddenly PC flags go up if Angelina Jolie plays an Egyptian queen of antiquity or Rain plays a Japanese ninja. I’m all for using a good Chinese actress for Mulan’s role… as long as they are good at it. Like I said, focus on Jamie Chung’s quality as an actress, not the fact that she’s Korean American, because then you’re just attacking it from the wrong, superficial angle.

          • Chris

            potentially degrading in terms of both gender and race***

          • Chris

            And if you’re really going to pursue some “white culture is homogenized so it’s not relevant” argument, let’s put this in perspective with a relevant analogy.

            In 200~ AD (around the time Mulan takes place), a Goguryeo woman plays the role of Mulan in a play. There was alot of cultural interaction between the Wei dynasty and the Goguryeo kingdom (before they went to war with each other) so this isnt particularly shocking.

            However, 200~ AD on the other side of the world, which is around the end of Marcus Aurelius’ rule of the Roman Empire IIRC and the timeframe that Gladiator takes place in, was at a time when the Empire was pushing into northern Britain, fighting the Picts, which were the inhabitants of modern Scotland. Telling the Romans that a Anglo-Pict would play a Roman general in drama would be comedic at best and a grave insult at worst.

            Considering the amount of cross pollination between the Korean and Chinese cultures throughout history, and throwing proper historical context into the equation, casting a Korean as a Chinese figure isn’t nearly as “ridiculous” as putting an Anglo/Celtic in the role of an antiquity Mediterranean imperial if you really want to go down that line of logic.

          • Chris

            Shit, I was thinking of Gerard Butler and not Russell Crowe (who is Australian with a Welsh background IIRC) as the star of Gladiator, but my point in general still stands.

          • mr. wiener

            He’s a Kiwi….originally.

          • Ruaraidh

            I actually think you are making some good points. But you’re probably wasting your time waiting for Kate to answer let alone thinking about it enough to preempt a possible argument she might make.

            Also continuing your analogy, less than a century after the events very loosely depicted in 300, the Celts were beginning a long series of invasions of the Hellenic world. I’m sure the ancient Spartans would have thought it highly ironic that a Celt was playing the hero of Thermopylae, when 2 centuries later a Greek coalition desperately, and unsuccessfully tried to hold the same pass against a massive Celtic invasion.

      • Justin_C

        lol, get along you two… you might bump into each other in ETWON or something :p

        • k

          Where in the world is ETWON? You mean Itaewon? And I would never go to Itaewon again, I hated the place when I did……every time I ever went was a bad experience…..When I was pregnant, I went to Itaewon around 5 PM on a Sunday to eat a burger at an American place and had a group of western men start making fun of me for being pregnant. Horrible, tacky place that is difficult to get a cab in…..

      • vetomon

        What about Daniel Craig play as pres Obama or Obama plays as the black James Bond.

        And Lucy Lu plays as Dr. Watson, she is not even a Brit.

  • mr. wiener

    This is not going to help much.
    Maybe they should get the native Islanders to vote on it…..hang on there aren’t any.

  • Anonton

    Omg why do they even care so much

  • A lot of articles about Japan in this Korea-related site… what about launch Japan Smash?

    • mr. wiener

      Japanbukkake anyone? Hand me a tissue please.

      • k

        Japanese Bukkake was the first asian porn I ever saw….

  • Daniel

    I think since the U.S. beat Japan in the last war the island belongs to the U.S…so I think both sides should back off and let Shell get to drilling!!

  • k

    I was at a Cheosok dinner a few days ago, the only american in the room full of koreans, decided to do a little trolling, I politely asked the dinner table, “Ive been reading the news and Im.confused, Doesnt Dokdo belong to the Japanese?” And ensued an hour debate of this issue while my husband gives me a look like “Really Kate?” ^_^

  • Sojubang

    Why can’t they just settle the same way bitter divorced parents do??. Korea gets custody of Dokdo Monday – Wednesday, Japan on Thursday – Saturday, Sundays alternate. Everyone is happy, everyone gets a piece of the Dokdo action!!

  • These island spats are becoming increasingly tense. May UN finds a solution to this soon. Good luck Japan

  • Cleo

    They’re not haunting Antarctica because they want to “research” whales:

    http://view.koreaherald.com/kh/view.php?ud=20121003000255&cpv=0

  • Jennster

    JAP wakao are really good @ this lol:

    Trolling mainlander Chinese under Taiwanese netizen name, then turning around to bash Taiwanese netizens.

    Guys, what’s their intention. :D

  • Changmi

    The translation above leaves something to be desired… “Korean sovereignty was established no later than the mid-17th century” should actually be “Japanese sovereignty was established no later than the mid-17th century,” and “it gets more valid sympathy than Japan” should be replaced with “it effectively administered Dokdo earlier than Japan.”

  • offalone

    Takeshima is historically a Japanese Territory, also an island that should rightfully be under Japanese occupation by the International law. Those South Koreans took our island and are illegally occupying it from 1952, Lee Seung Man that fucking bastard! Mainly, the San Francisco treaty didn’t include the so called ‘Dokdo’ as a Korean island. Not just that, we have more evidence that proves Takeshima as a Japanese territory! Fucking Korean Pricks! BTW, your mouse looking president was made in Japan lol.
    [Japanese point of view]

    To us, the island is a symbol of Korean sovereignty from foreign power, especially Japan 「Japanese Occupation of Korea 1910~1945」. It means a lot to us. While the Japanese view the island as a stragetic area for Natural resources and the increasing of Sea territory. Dokdo was under our reign since the 7th century during the (from the) SHILLA PERIOD UNTIL NOW! we have numerous ancient maps, scholars and evidence proving it too. There are also evidence that the San Francisco treaty acknowledged the island as a Korean territory. The islands are Korean territory, were gonna do what we wanna do with it, so mind your own affairs, Japs. Oh, I think we should make some more AEGIS ships and finish Constructing the Jeju Navy Base hehe Y don’t u guys stop licking Tojo and his friends’ ass and repent like what the Germans did? Filthy Fucking Japanese shits!「Japanese politicians’ visit of the Shrine」International Law my ass. Dokdo is Korean territory by the International law, get it?
    [South Korean Point of view]

    Fuckin’ Tojos bringing up a fight, huh? C’mon, I’ll give them what they want. Dokdo is Korean territory bitches, I’ll give them pain and revenge the atrocities of our ancestors for what they have done! Hate to say it but, guess I’ll have to support those American Ass lickin’ Southern Capitalists on this one!
    [North Korean point of view]

    Stop Fighting! You two are my Allies, you guys shouldn’t be fighting each other! Weren’t we supposed to unite and form a US-ROK-JP Alliance to pressure the North Koreans and Chinese? Jesus Christ stop fighting and apologize to each other. Don’t make me intervene and clean up this Fuckin’ Mess.
    [American point of view]

    Hehehehe~ Keep on fighting Fools! Piece of shits! I wish this can last forever so that nobody can intervene and pressure me about my buisness!
    [Chinese point of view]

    Pretty complicated.

  • JustSomeDude

    Both sides need to calm the hell down. Don’t kill each other over a piece of rock…you are both great countries with fantastic cultures! Use dialogue and diplomacy.

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